Sunday, February 1, 2009

Seeing as our Founding Fathers and Ladies are nestling snuggly in banks of Indiana snow, and we in England , ourselves, are promised a few inches on Monday morning, I thought it apt to bring down off the shelf, my blue ink and dip pen, and bring the knighthood the fine words of Robert Frost, whose poem : 'Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening' captures exquisitely the muffled and divine essence of the world around you almost stopping still, of nature on hold, and for one brief moment, like being in the vast space of an empty cathedral, or the silence of a house when you wake at dawn, your mind attunes to a place far beyond your mortal being.



( view from Sir Dayvd's castle winter 2007/08 )
Sir D ( ready to stack up the snowballs ) of Old Oxen-ford


4 comments:

Sir Hook of Warrick aka "David K Wells" said...

Thank you for sharing that inspiring poem! Yes, my favorite Cathedral in the world is actually located in two places...the first is any pine forest covered in snow...and the 3 mile stretch of live oak trees overhanging the road to Kiawah Island from Charleston, SC.

Sir Hook Who Has Miles to Go Before I Sleep of Warrick

Anonymous said...

Sir Davyd, thank you for the reminder to stop and smell the snow and hear the sounds (generators around here and ice cracking!) of nature as we continue on our life's journey. Noticed England has some snow of her own this week.

Sir Hook,
Charleston is shaping up to be our fall trip - any info would be welcome! Folly Island?

Lady Suzanne of Greenbriar

Anonymous said...

Yes, Suz, we had our annual flump of eight inches here in the south ( a little more, up in scotland ) which predictably brought the South to a grinding halt.

Its embaressing to talk about UK snow in the south, as we get it so infrequently, that there is no budget for dealing with it, as by the time you have mobilised anything the stuff has melted the next day...but for one day everyone walks around throwing snowballs at one another , or getting the plastic bowl toboggans out and going up the nearest slope to ride down it.

As you will see here , this is a very condensed organically shaped island, and the motoring is fast and relentless, and relies on nothing getting in its way.. ( a flat tire causes gridlock LOL...so good luck to whoever is taking the wheel out of your expedition LOL )...

so as you can imagine, with whole generations of young kids out on the road who have never driven in a decent fall of snow...it was chaos for a few hours...
The embarassing bit for me is,
I know from living in PA...and having friends in Canada and Indiana such as yourselves...that you spend two or three months of the winter happily living in sub zero temps and going about your daily work.....if this was the case in the UK... it would collapse and we would be on an economic par with other islands in the world like Fiji, or Jamaica LOl...
The one thing that has always put the GREAT, in Great Britain ( that most people overlook.).. is the very warm Gulf Stream, that whirls its way up from South America across the Atlantic, and swirls around our south and western coasts, bringing warm English rains most of the year round. Occasionally the vortex of a weather front will be so large it will over reach itself and scoop freezing air off Russia and dump snow or cold winds on us....as has just happened.

So basically...that is why you will need to probably pack a raincoat when you come in July, for while we get gentle winters here, equally we usually just get showery warm Summers.

Sir Dayvd ( the Brit weather expert..cos it affects his daily trade ) of Oxfordshire...

Anonymous said...

okay, starting my packing list...one raincoat

I think we're walking or using transportation as much as possible though Sir Hook did offer to get a car
Sir Bowie and I will just canoodle in the back seat ; )


enjoy your winter - sounds like it'll only last a few hours

Lady S